"Fog at Kingston Bridge" - 1949



Exhibited at RPS

SDJ's notes:-

How can you infuse 'mood and mystery' into your pictures ? My advice is to go out and take pictures during mist or fog. This exposure was made during such conditions.

Walking along the Kingston Bridge, I noticed the lamp-light first, but realised that to 'make a picture', some human interest was neccessary. Under unusual lighting conditions, it is advisable to consult an exposure meter. My Weston meter indicated 1/20th second at f/2 using Panatomic-X film.

It was not long before the camera was set on the tripod and the exposure made, as the figures approached the pre-conceived spot. The gentleman with the little boy paused for a second as he passed by, looked me up and down and said "You are wasting your time, you can't make photos in this light !"

Fortunately, the figures and the trolley bus in the distance were coming towards the camera so that an exposure of 1/20th second was sufficient to arrest the movement. This shutter speed would not have been fast enough to stop the movement of a body moving across the scene. (This picture was also known as 'Foggy Evening' and 'Fog at Kingston Bridge')
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer:

"Fog at Kingston Bridge" - 1949



Exhibited at RPS

SDJ's notes:-

How can you infuse 'mood and mystery' into your pictures ? My advice is to go out and take pictures during mist or fog. This exposure was made during such conditions.

Walking along the Kingston Bridge, I noticed the lamp-light first, but realised that to 'make a picture', some human interest was neccessary. Under unusual lighting conditions, it is advisable to consult an exposure meter. My Weston meter indicated 1/20th second at f/2 using Panatomic-X film.

It was not long before the camera was set on the tripod and the exposure made, as the figures approached the pre-conceived spot. The gentleman with the little boy paused for a second as he passed by, looked me up and down and said "You are wasting your time, you can't make photos in this light !"

Fortunately, the figures and the trolley bus in the distance were coming towards the camera so that an exposure of 1/20th second was sufficient to arrest the movement. This shutter speed would not have been fast enough to stop the movement of a body moving across the scene. (This picture was also known as 'Foggy Evening' and 'Fog at Kingston Bridge')
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: